Day 5: Thankful for farmers

Day 5 thankful

This one hits home with me. Why do some folks out there think that family farms are obsolete, that all farms are “corporate” farms – whatever that means. Yes, 97 percent of farms are family businesses – and the key word there is “business.” Just like any other business on Main Street, businesses in this day and age must continue to grow to remain viable. The family farm of today looks little like the 1950s version, but that’s not a bad thing. In fact, in 1950 my family’s farm was a one man show. My grandpa milked a few cows and delivered milk around town. Today, my family has grown that farm to support three Campbell families plus several full-time and part-time employees. I’d say that’s a good progress.

Click here to view the entire series.

Day 3: Thankful for farmers

Day 3 thankful

Why yes, I am aware that I missed a few days. But hey, let’s be honest. I’m unorganized and have a few balls in the air. So sorry for the delay. I’ll get caught up. I promise.

Click here to view the entire series.

Day 1: Thankful for farmers

Farmers and ranchers and the entire agriculture industry often go unnoticed. They simply go about their work, raising food for the world while the world eats. But during the month of Thanksgiving, High Plains Journal wants to remind consumers to be thankful for those who put food on their tables each and every day of the year. This month, I’ll be sharing the series with you, in hopes that you will say a little prayer of thanksgiving for the farmers and ranchers of the world.

Day 1 to be thankful

Click here to view the entire series.

Near the end

It’s about time to go to our last show of the year. I love showing. Really, I do. But I can say that I am going to be glad for a little break. Here’s where I should probably talk about the fact that I don’t have to do chores, but rarely do they trust me to do chores. And perhaps that has a little to do with the few mornings when they have asked me to feed and I get busy and forget. Until the next day. Not good. Not good at all.

Or maybe I should be saying that I be glad for the break on our bank account. And that’s real. This showing stuff is expensive.

But really, what I’m most happy about is that I won’t find this tracked all over my entire house.

 
Untitled

We bed on wood shavings and they stick to everything. Ev.ery.thing.

So next week when I’m sad our show season is over, (or maybe it will take until the week after that) remind me that I’m not constantly vacuuming, sweeping and picking up shavings. That should cheer me up.

Today is unusual

One of the first things I do every day, is look at my calendar for the day. Ok. I don’t always do that and sometimes I miss appointments. Like last night when I should have taken my oldest son to a meeting. I forgot.

That was until my phone beeped at me 15 minutes before it was to start and by then, it was way past time to be able to get there before the meeting was over. I’ve recently switched to an electronic calendar that I can sync with my phone. It is supposed to keep me from making those mistakes, but hey. Nobody’s perfect.

Back to the point. This morning, this is what my calendar looked like.

And this is what my afternoon and evening looks like.

I intend for this to be glorious. I am checking things off my “To-Do” list right and left. Hence, a new blog post.

And if you are my friend and know that I’ve forgotten to put something on here, just don’t burst my bubble. Let me enjoy it. Please?

Green power

4Hbest 

It’s National 4-H week. So to celebrate, the boys sported a little green power by wearing their 4-H shirts this week.

image

And I finally focused and wrote my column about the power of green.

Green power

By Holly Martin

“You know, if every kid in the inner cities in this country belonged to 4-H, we wouldn’t have much of a crime problem.”

If that ain’t the truth. President Bill Clinton couldn’t have been more right.
I know he’s right because I’ve seen firsthand what 4-H teaches young people. As I write this, we are in the middle of celebrating National 4-H Week. The power of that green 4-H clover is great for so many reasons.

<more>

One of those days

You know how people say there should be some separation between your work and personal life? Yeah, well. I’m not very good at that.

So here I sit at my computer at work and I’m supposed to be writing a column about work stuff – about agriculture and the stupid Congress that hasn’t passed the stupid farm bill. Or about the stupid drought. Or whatever.

And as hard as I try, I cannot make my brain head in that direction. All it wants to do is dread tomorrow. Tomorrow is the day that we will lay my friend to rest. And I worry about her husband and her boys. I wonder: Do they need dress socks? Are their boots polished? Do the boys even have a handkerchief? They are going to need one of those tomorrow.

You know, all the things that a mom should be thinking. And I’m a mom and they don’t have theirs anymore. And that’s just not right.

I know. I know. God has a plan. I get it. But crimeny, it’s hard to accept sometimes, isn’t it?

I was scrolling through the texts on my phone and there it was. Just a couple of days ago she was going to stop by my office to bring me some stuff for 4-H. And I told her not to worry about it. I’d see her soon. I’d get it then.

Only I won’t see her soon.

And so what I’m saying is this: Sometimes life sucks and today is one of those days.

Sometimes . . .

578466_10151092259402832_335896393_n

Sometimes, you just don’t know what to say.

Sometimes, words fail you.

Sometimes, it seems that no matter what comes to you, it just can’t heal the ache in your heart.

And that’s how it is today. The ache in my heart is big and my tears are many. My friend, Tammy Draper, passed away.

In the time since her death, I’ve done nothing else but think about the huge hole she has left in her family and in our community.

Tammy had so many friends. She was involved in everything. If there was something that needed organized, she was there, lending a helping hand.

I knew her best in the role of 4-H leader. Just a couple of weeks ago, we had a long discussion about why we felt 4-H was so important to our families. She wanted her boys to learn responsibility, leadership and determination. She spent hours volunteering for the organization just to give her kids – and mine – those kinds of opportunities.

I admired her for that and so much more. She knew what was important and didn’t let the little things like the fact her house wasn’t in Martha Stewart condition 24/7 bother her. It was infinitely more important to her to be at a ballgame cheering her kids on, or working in the barn alongside her family. She had her priorities straight.

She always had a smile and I can hear her laughing even now. She and her husband were a great team, working together always. Her mission in life was to raise her boys to be men that they would be proud of some day. And you know what? She was well on the way to accomplishing that goal.

I can’t think of that without the tears falling. But I know Tammy. And I know she wouldn’t want her memory to keep us from continuing on. She would much rather have us put our energy into continuing the things she loved so much. She would want the livestock shows and ballgames to go on.

And so I will. I will continue on, knowing that her spirit is with me. And if I pause, every now and then to let the tears fall, I know she will understand.

DSCN0381